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Regular April Meeting: Student Research at Acadia

April 15 @ 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm

At this meeting we will have presentations by four Acadia students who will talk about their research projects.

NOTE THAT DUE TO EXAMS, THIS MEETING ONLY WILL BE HELD IN THE BASEMENT OF THE K.C. IRVING ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE CENTRE.

Using Hunter-sourced Materials to Study Black Bears in the Maritimes
Brittni Scott, MSc Candidate, Biology, Acadia University
This study is estimating the genetic health of our bears and what may be affecting it, as well as investigating the population structure to better understand gene flow patterns in the Maritimes.

Better Understanding Invertebrate Fisheries: Case Study of the Orange-Footed Sea Cucumber
Danni Harper, MSc Candidate, Biology, Acadia University
The sea cucumbers, Cucumaria frondosa is harvested as a luxury food and for its bioactive properties which are being tested for many pharmaceuticals, such as anti-inflammatories and antimicrobials, for humans and pets. C. frondosa are both ecologically and economically significant and a better understanding of their biology is integral for implementing effective management leading to sustainable harvest.

A 100-year Paleolimnological Record of Environmental Change from Cecil Lake, Northern British Columbia: Application to the Assessment of the Habitat Viability for Migratory Waterfowl.
Garrett Velkjar, MSc Candidate, Geology and Environmental Science, Acadia University
Cecil Lake, British Columbia, is a highly productive, shallow lake supports a diverse ecosystem with a significant breeding population of eared grebes (Podiceps nigricollis). The sediment cores collected from this lake were analyzed using portable X-ray fluorescence and isotope analysis. Anthropogenic environmental change associated with the arrival of European pioneers was interpreted to be the primary driver of change within Cecil Lake.

Shared Seafood, Segregated Spaces: Diet and Foraging Movements of Breeding Arctic and Common Terns on Country Island, Nova Scotia.
Avery Nagy-MacArthur, MSc Candidate, Biology, Acadia University
The rocky and remote Country Island, off of Nova Scotia’s Eastern shore, hosts the province’s largest colony of breeding Arctic Terns and Common Terns. This project integrates diet analysis with novel GPS tracking to generate new insight into relationships between habitat use and diet in Arctic and Common Terns, and to determine how these species coexist while foraging within the marine landscape of the Eastern shore.

Details

Date:
April 15
Time:
7:30 pm - 9:30 pm

Venue

K.C Irving Environmental Science Centre
32 University Avenue
Wolfville, Nova Scotia Canada
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