Follow our Facebook page for the most up to date news, events and interesting stories.

See our recent posts

Great info on boreal felt lichen.Nicknamed the panda for its rarity, about 300 occurrences of boreal felt lichen are known in Nova Scotia. The species is believed to have been extirpated from New Brunswick, where it was first formally described in 1902. In Sweden the species occurred in a single forested area, which was protected in an effort to conserve it, but clearcutting on adjacent land caused humidity levels within the lichen's habitat to drop, and the last known specimens died. Apart from Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and Alaska are the only places where individuals of this species are thought to exist.Did you know?Lichen is a composite organism. It arises from the relationship between algae or cyanobacteria that live among the filaments of multiple species of fungus. The fungi provide protection, moisture and some nutrients to the algae or cyanobacteria. In return the algae or cyanobacteria provide the fungi with energy in the form of carbohydrates (sugars) that they produce through photosynthesis. Put another way, “Lichens are fungi that have discovered agriculture.” - Trevor GowardBoreal felt lichen occurs in mature balsam fir stands within 25 km of Nova Scotia’s southern shore, typically on the north-facing side of old-growth tree trunks near sphagnum moss wetlands. The undisturbed coniferous forests of southeastern Cape Breton from Port Hawkesbury to Gabarus are a particular hot spot.This species is very sensitive to air pollution and acid rain, nearby road building, clearcutting, tree plantations, and other land development, as well as climate change and severe weather events. In a recent article in the journal Botany predicts that the remaining global population of boreal felt lichen will be reduced by half by 2040.COSEWIC (Canada-wide) conservation status: CRITICALLY ENDANGEREDConservation status in Nova Scotia: ENDANGEREDYou can help the boreal felt lichen and its surrounding habitat by finding it, taking a photograph, and reporting your sighting to 1-866-727-3447 or biodiversity@novascotia.ca. 
In Nova Scotia a 500 metre Special Management Zone (SMZ) must be established around all known occurrences of boreal felt lichen. Within a 200 metre radius of the lichen, forest harvesting, mineral exploration, and road construction are forbidden. Additional restrictions apply to the 200-500-metre radius Restricted Zone.Photo credit: “Photo 1166560 - Boreal Felt Lichen (Erioderma pedicellatum)” by Einar Timdal is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 / Cropped for Facebook, enhanced in Photoswww.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/legalcodeThe adapted image is shared under the same terms. ... See MoreSee Less

2 hours ago  ·  

View on Facebook
Timeline PhotosWe saw this & thought it was pretty cool! We know that there will be many birds making nests in & around your gardens/home/barn etc. this season! So here's a little graphic that may help you identify which bird it belongs to! 🐦Happy gardening this season! Oh, & remember, we've got seeds here if you need them!😁😁😁Look out for those nests! Have a good rest of your day everyone!#HPFM #hennypennys #hennypennysfarmmarket ... See MoreSee Less

2 hours ago  ·  

View on Facebook

Join our Facebook group

Share pictures and observations or ask questions; our growing community would love to have you join in!

Instagram